north star reverse osmosis system review Wine books have insights behind the scenes-Ocpuritech-img

north star reverse osmosis system review Wine books have insights behind the scenes

by:Ocpuritech     2019-08-11
north star reverse osmosis system review Wine books have insights behind the scenes
Books: "Authentic Wine towards nature and sustainable winemaking", "ideal wine", "vineyard in my glass", "Voodoo wine dealer in San Francisco, California", Wednesday, August 10, 2011.Books: "Authentic Wine towards nature and sustainable winemaking", "ideal wine", "vineyard in my glass", "Voodoo wine dealer in San Francisco, California", Wednesday, August 10, 2011.It may be summer, but it is certainly not easy to read this year.This is good: a new wine book brings amazing intellectual advantage, just like a request to end a bunch of thumbs --People finally heard suggestions for sucking memoirs and rote memorization.It's been a while since the Big Book of California wines surfaced, David Darlington, one of the stories of wine, has changed the "ideal wine" (Harper, page 356, $26.99).The subtitle "A generation for perfection" reveals Darlington's focusand Profit -In California, "The generation with problems is the baby boomers.This is both an advantage of the book and a disadvantage of it.Two baby boomer generations, especially the main characters: Randall Graeme of bonnidonne vineyard and Leo macloski of Enologix, their controversial algorithm for improving key scores in wineDarlington has a keen eye on the characters, and these two lenses perfectly cover the last 15 years of California wine --That is to say, the rise of mature, soft styles embodied by Grahm (with the help of McCloskey's work) and the unstable balance of ideology and business.The book is worth a look for McCloskey's proprietary world (he encourages customers to "suck sweet," pull the red wine off the skin before the fermentation is complete, to soften its outline )."Ideal" will be your last spear for any innocence you maintain in the wine industry.But sometimes the book feels too focused on the snapshot of the moment.Grahm's current efforts to create new formats (see sfg.Ly/aZ7nZz) was wiped out in this selfReferring to the hipster wine world, few people acknowledge that the new generation of California people have very different views on wine.However, this may be beyond the reach of Darlington's mission.If you are passionate about his concerns, there is no doubt that he is a sharp example of the bold hope and brutal reality of the wine generation, which, as critics say, is fully mature.The name of Gerald Ashel is well-founded for attention.This long-standing gourmet wine editor's sparkling detailed prose can often convey the cultural story of wine in one sentence.So if "my glass vineyard" (University of California Press, p. 280, $29 ).95) is a compilation of his previous magazine work and an opportunity to relive the beauty of wine writing in a pure form.Some old works do not have the feeling of being out of date, but retain eternity.In particular, parts of California (Lodi, Anderson Valley, Veeder Hill, etc.) capture an instant in an industry that has never stopped."Authentic Wine" is less lyrical but certainly equally serious (UC Press, page 260, $29 ).British writers Jamie good and Sam haroppThere is no wine romance between these covers, but for more (organic farming, endless sustainability) and less (reverse osmosis, acidification, there is a sea of savvy detail that is worth the pleasure of making wines nuances.It's not something in lush fields and cellars, but given all the things that the industry doesn't want us to consider, it's a rare opportunity.Good and haropp are very careful.Organic practice of biodynamics, there may not be more controversial topics in wineEspecially because many writers regard its mysterious practice as a voodoo.This intellectual laziness has led Catherine Cole to the title of her book, the Voodoo Winery (Oregon State University.News, page 182, $18.95).Oregon Wine columnist Cole wisely bypassed the usual sound of horns to learn the real nuances of biodynamic wine.She focuses on her hometown, a perfect place because of the U.S.Demeter's office, a biopower certification body, is there.Oregon is a paradise for bio-powered winegrowing, and Cole touches the heart of the problem: for something that is not hard science and mystery behind it, bio-powered has proven itself to be very effective.Cole wisely balanced this precarious reality.So she did a very good job of putting this philosophy of agriculture in the current context --In a world where localism is a cottage industry, it is an eye-catching, quirky practice.However, biodynamics is also a cottage industry, and the chapter "big biodynamics" cleverly details how practice is expanded.If there are any shortcomings, it's that Cole's exploration of sport founder Rudolf Steiner may be too creditable (though she avoids something that's easy to target: Steiner is a bit like kookSemite).But Cole finds a savvy middle ground on a subject that tends to be extreme."Voodoo" is enough for believers and non-believersBelievers are rethinking their position.Jon Bonne is the wine editor of The Chronicle.E-Email her at jbonne @ sfchronicle.com.
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